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160 Teekay vessels to implement new e-mail platform

Thomas Heide, Dualog Thomas Heide, Dualog

Teekay is to implement an improved vessel e-mail system across its 160-strong fleet, following the agreement of a new contract with Norwegian maritime IT company Dualog, the companies report.

{mprestriction ids="1,2"}Work has already started on the project, with more than 100 vessels having been equipped in the first three months of the roll out, Dualog says.

“There was a lot of planning carried out across a number of our network of offices – including Glasgow, Manila, Vancouver and Singapore – and after some fine tuning of the systems following the results of the pilot project, we began the process of upgrading the e-mail systems on the fleet,” explained Stuart Mackenzie, regional and vessel systems IT manager at Teekay Shipping.

“We saw the need for a more modern and proven maritime e-mail solution, which included a file transfer solution built in.”  

The new e-mail platform is also expected to improve cyber resilience in the network, with security features built into the software that have been designed for the maritime environment. Dualog says it currently delivers service uptime of 99.98 per cent on the platform.

“Teekay contacted us because they needed to find a new and reliable mobile business e-mail solution for their vessels. We took the time to understand and map their needs and have delivered a solution that will result in efficiency gains for the owner,” said Thomas Heide, international sales manager at Dualog

“Ensuring 100 vessels, or two thirds of the project, were upgraded within three months was remarkable and was the result of careful planning and pilot work carried out on a handful of units. The Teekay ships will start to see strong operational benefits from what is a web-based e-mail system.”{/mprestriction}

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